No one ever has to “speak up” to keep roads open

In RIPTA, Transportation by Jef Nickerson3 Comments

From the Warwick Beacon:

“The governor always pushed for greater efficiencies to minimize service reductions,” said Fred Sneesby, a spokesperson for Governor Donald Carcieri.

Right now the fare increases and service reductions have not been set in stone and Sneesby encourages anyone affected by these changes to make their voices heard at the open meetings.

“People need to speak up,” said Sneesby.

No one ever has to attend a public hearing to say, “yes, I’d like you to keep Route 95 open this year please.”

I’m just saying.

About the Author

Jef Nickerson

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Jef is Greater City Providence's co-founder, editor, and publisher. He grew up on Cape Cod and lived in Boston; Portland, Maine; and New York before settling in Providence. In addition to urbanism, Jef is interested in art, design, and ice cream. Please feel free to contact Jef if you have any question or comments about Greater City Providence.

Comments

  1. At this point, the best hope for RIPTA to avoid the cuts and fare increase is the bill in the US Congress that would provide $2 billion in emergency funds to rescind fare increases and restore cuts. Hopefully, even if the board approves the deficit reduction plan, if the feds come through with the money, this action can be reversed.

  2. “No one ever has to attend a public hearing to say, ‘yes, I’d like you to keep Route 95 open this year please.'”

    I lived right next to the detour that trucks had to take to avoid the rt-95 Pawtucket bridge, and it’s nearly as bad with the DOT as it is with RIPTA. Having 18-wheelers roll through residential neighborhoods is not a good thing. The foundation of the house and the nearby road took quite an extra beating.

    How we can’t keep roads and buses funded when we’re so heavily subsidized by the federal government -and- spend so much more than our neighbors is beyond me. It’s a highly inaccurate way to calculate it, but if you take the Mass DOT’s budget and divide it by the number of highway miles they service, and then do the same with RI, it looks like we pay almost twice what they do per-mile of highway.

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