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News & Notes

The Atlantic Cities The Scourge of 1970s-Era Office Towers

There’s a particular flavor of 1970s-era office tower that’s starting to feel its age. Your city probably has at least one. Stuck in between the perceived coolness of early 20th century facades and the newness of all-glass towers, these buildings are having a hard time retaining existing tenants, let alone attracting new ones.

The article is about ’70s era office towers, but some things to think about in regards to the Superman Building in Providence.


Transportation Nation: Feds Pitch First-Ever Distracted Driving Guidelines For Automakers

Automakers should disable potentially distracting technology unless the car is turned off – or in “park.”

That’s the message from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which unveiled the first-ever federally proposed guidelines to encourage manufacturers to keep dashboard distractions to a minimum.

The guidelines – which are voluntary – would apply to “communications, entertainment, information gathering and navigation devices or functions that are not required to safely operate the vehicle.”


DC Streetsblog: Flashback: Ronald Reagan Touts Gas Tax Hike, Transit Funding as Job Creators

On January 6, 1983, the icon of the modern conservative movement, Ronald Reagan, signed legislation to raise the gas tax for the first time in more than two decades, devoting a portion of the revenue to transit.

We’ve been reading about this moment a lot, as the current GOP leadership in the House tries to undo Reagan’s legacy by eviscerating dedicated transit funding.


Next American City: Destined to Fail: Rust Belt Cities Without Rail

Any major American city that solely relies on streets and highways for its transportation network will fail to remain competitive and will falter economically over time. That includes cities with bus transit systems that rely on the same streets and highways.


The Atlantic Cities: Why Alleys Deserve More Attention

Daniel Toole is a 26-year-old, Seattle-based architect who has, quite accidentally, found himself immersed in the hidden world of alleys. Recently awarded a travel fellowship by the local American Institute of Architects branch, he headed to Japan and Australia to study this arguably under-appreciated urban form. Upon his return, Toole produced a self-published book, Tight Urbanism, followed by a photographic exhibition that spilled over several alleys in his own city. His blog, Alleys of Seattle, features entries from his travels as well as observances on efforts to preserve and revitalize alleys here in the U.S. and abroad. Toole took time out to chat with Atlantic Cities about his alley obsession.

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One Response to News & Notes

  1. Jack February 21, 2012 at 12:49 pm #

    So many of the complaints about buildings in other cities sound similar to those voiced against the Superman building.

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