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News & Notes

→ The Hill: Obama urges House GOP to ‘follow the Senate’s lead’ on $109B highway bill

The White House on Monday continued to pressure the House to accept the $109 billion transportation bill that was passed last week by the Senate, saying that President Obama was ready to sign the measure into law.

The administration has long signaled it supported the Senate’s version of the federal highway bill over the five-year, $260 billion that had been under consideration in the House. The pressure has been amplified since the Senate approved its version of the measure with 74 votes.


→ Next American City: Can the Arts Save Struggling Cities?

Advocates of creative placemaking are careful not to present their work as a panacea. But they firmly believe that art has a central role in reviving urban economies and communities. As examples, Coletta offers the Design District in Miami; the ArtPrize festival in Grand Rapids, Mich.; WaterFire, which lights up the rivers in downtown Providence, R.I., with dozens of bonfires; and the Studio Museum in Harlem, which is credited with helping to fuel the resurgence there.


→ jasonpbecker: Providence needs a little innovation

There are now two cities in the US that are employing a new kind of CIO- the Chief Innovation Officer – whose role is to connect government resources, be they employees, data, or infrastructure, with folks who can do something new, exciting, and useful for city residents.


→ Next American City: INTERVIEW: Mike Lydon and the Ideal Streetscape

…NAC spoke with Mike Lydon, a board member of CNU New York and founder of the Miami- and New York City-based planning firm, The Street Plans Collaborative. In 2009 he co-authored, with Andres Duany and Jeff Speck, The Smart Growth Manual, the quintessential textbook for building sustainable projects. Here Lydon talks zoning codes, cycling infrastructure and why streets should accommodate all forms of transportation, not pit one against the other.


→ Washington Examiner Name a Virginia road for $5,000 to $200,000

Cough up $200,000, promise not to use potty humor, and you could get to name your favorite stretch of interstate in Virginia.

Desperate for cash to build and fix roads, Virginia recently approved legislation that would allow corporations or individuals to pay to put their names on the state’s roads and bridges. Following a successful program that allowed corporations to brand state highway rest stops, the naming-rights measure is expected to generate tens of millions of dollars for roads, according to transportation officials who are now identifying which pieces of the state’s infrastructure are ripe for naming and what to charge.


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One Response to News & Notes

  1. Jason March 20, 2012 at 8:53 pm #

    Thanks for linking.

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