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GoLocal Providence: 195 Bidder Carpionato Failed to Redevelop Providence Fruit Market

fruit-produce-warehouse

Former Fruit and Produce Warehouse (left) in March 2005 prior to demolition.

The Carpionato Group, who recently submitted a proposal to the 195 Commission to develop the former highway land, has to date not developed a previous acquisition of prime Providence real estate — the former historic Fruit and Produce Warehouse.

Following its purchase of the warehouse from the state — and controversial demolition of the historic property in 2008 — Carpionato, the Johnston-based commercial real estate firm, had presented plans to turn the former fruit market into a mixed used office, retail and hotel development, which have not materialized. The city granted Carpionato preliminary approval for a surface parking lot at the location in 2013.

See also:
Greater City Providence: ProJo outlines developer’s vision for east side 195 parcels
Greater City Providence: Fruit and Produce safety hazard
Greater City Providence: Yes, you can haz demo permit

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7 Responses to GoLocal Providence: 195 Bidder Carpionato Failed to Redevelop Providence Fruit Market

  1. Mark Moreno May 27, 2014 at 7:51 pm #

    That was a sad sad moment. This was around the time I got interested in urban planning. So many planned projects in providence during that time that never got built (The empire at broadway, 110 Westminster, the American Locomotive Works project (which technically was constructed but never completed due to lack of funds if I recall) ect.) Lets think on the bright side and be optimistic.

  2. Sam May 28, 2014 at 10:04 am #

    I can be optimistic … but not about anything Carpionato does. Fool me once …

  3. mothra May 29, 2014 at 10:31 pm #

    RI has been fooled by Carpionato many times. Like the time it “mistakenly” cut down all the trees that were to be saved up at that Chapel View project in Cranston after they got approval partially because they agreed to save the trees. They got the Produce project because they agreed to redevelop it. I’m sorry but they should not even be allowed to bid on this project.

  4. Andrew I May 30, 2014 at 7:41 am #

    Carpionato proudly shows their name on the sign for the zero pedestrian access University Heights strip mall where the sidewalks along North Main Street and Doyle Avenue are never ever cleared of snow and ice. Shameless? Clueless? Brazen.

  5. Steve May 31, 2014 at 10:40 pm #

    Carpionato also failed to build a planned 18 story hotel on a Capital Center parcel…the triangle located between the federal court building and Memorial Blvd.

    They are not to be trusted. Any agreement with them should give a tight timeline (24 months) to build according to plan or revoke the contract.

  6. mothra June 2, 2014 at 6:22 pm #

    And pay a substantial fine for wasting everyone’s time. AGAIN.

  7. margherita pryor June 9, 2014 at 8:52 am #

    I agree totally with comments about this company’s dismal track record. It’s ironic that there is now so much interest in other places — Boston being one example — in having a permanent location to showcase local products, not only food and produce but also other unique items created in the state. At the time the demolition was being authorized, I wrote to the city asking why it wasn’t being considered for a permanent indoor farmer’s and food market. It had all the necessary infrastructure. And unlike the Hope Artiste site, the warehouse site actually had the potential to spark development around it with connections to many different parts of the city. No surprise — not even an acknowledgement of receiving comments from a citizen, much less an explanation of why this company was allowed first to let the property deteriorate and then to tear it down because of its poor and hazardous condition.

    Don’t let Carpionato bid on anything! Most effective procurement systems allow reviewers to consider a bidder’s former performance in their selections. This company should be penalized for its miserable record.

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