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PPS Symposium – Beyond Buildings: Preserving the Livable Neighborhood – November 5-7, 2015

Image from PPS’ 2014 Symposium – Photo by Cat Laine

From Providence Preservation Society:


Beyond Buildings: Preserving the Livable Neighborhood

Providence’s neighborhoods help us trace how the city was built, and why. Through them, we reveal the people and cultures that contributed to the city’s evolution. Each neighborhood tells a unique story of Providence and its people. Over time, as the city matured and populations shifted, local landmarks also took on new roles, uses, and meanings and residential, commercial, civic, and recreational spaces evolved.

Beyond Buildings: Preserving the Livable Neighborhood, will examine neighborhood identity, community assets, and the importance of “human capital” to the city’s success. Building on our 2014 focus on downtown Providence and what makes a great city, we are now moving into our residential districts to discuss programs and policy blueprints for upward mobility, sustainability, and community development, honoring the individual character of Providence’s neighborhoods.

Speakers include:

  • Donovan Rypkema, Principal of PlaceEconomics
  • Majora Carter, Urban Revitalization Strategist and Social-Enterprise Pioneer
  • Ned Kaufman, author of Place, Race, and Story: Essays on the Past and Future of Historic Preservation.
November 5 – 7, 2015
The King’s Cathedral
1860 Westminster Street, Olneyville

For more information and to register visit ProvidenceSymposium.com

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ProJo: Symposium offers wish list of ideas to spur development of Route 195 land

ridot-195

Photo from RIDOT

Jan A. Brodie expects there’ll be a groundbreaking in 2015 on the vacant former highway land in the heart of the capital city, but she unveiled a holiday wish list Friday afternoon for what she thinks would push forward pending development projects.

Brodie, executive director of the I-195 Redevelopment District Commission, would like no sales tax and no corporate taxes for projects built on the nearly 19 acres available for development after the state’s highway-relocation project. She’d like an “institutionalized, predictable” tax-stabilization agreement for city property taxes that would last at least 15 years, she told about 60 people gathered for the final session of the Providence Preservation Society’s year-long symposium, “Building the New Urban Experience.”


No one on the panel supported Chapel View as a vision for what should be done on the 195 land. Thank goodness.

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Providence Preservation Society Symposium – November 6-8, 2014

pps-symposium-save-date-2014

The 2013-2014 Providence Symposium speaker series is cultivating an important dialogue on preservation, development and quality of place, with a specific focus on Downtown Providence. From open space to transportation, economic assets to partnerships, we explore the key components in the making of a great city.

The series brings national experts to Providence to talk about creating healthy and successful urban environments. Join us and take part in this critical conversation about our city.

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The Providence Preservation Society’s 56th Annual Meeting featuring Jennifer Bradley – January 23, 2014

Brookings Institution Fellow and Co-Author of The Metropolitan Revolution JENNIFER BRADLEY to Speak at PPS’ 56th Annual Meeting

Second in PPS’ Yearlong Speaker Series entitled Not Always Easy: Building the New Urban Experience 2014 Ten Most Endangered Properties List Announced

jennifer-bradleyThe Providence Preservation Society welcomes Jennifer Bradley, fellow at the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program and co-author of The Metropolitan Revolution, to their 56th Annual Meeting on Thursday, January 23, 2014, 5:30 pm, at Brown University’s Salomon Center. The event is also the second installment of PPS’ yearlong speaker series entitled Not Always Easy: Building the New Urban Experience, featuring dynamic urban leaders and experts on topics including government and development, open space and public land, and transportation. Ms. Bradley will speak to the context of her book, co-written with Bruce Katz, on how cities and metros are fixing our broken politics and fragile economy.

The Metropolitan Revolution is a thought-leading book on the shift back to our nation’s urban cores. Jennifer Bradley, along with her co-author Bruce Katz, is leading the dialogue on how cities can flourish and ultimately be the drivers for the next economy,” stated Brent Runyon, Executive Director of the Providence Preservation Society. “The Providence Preservation Society has long contributed to the economic vitality of Rhode Island through its work in the capital city, preserving our important past while being a partner in the city’s growth. We are excited to have Ms. Bradley with us to share examples from other cities as our second speaker in the Not Always Easy: Building the New Urban Experience series, and as we turn the page to another year of preservation in Providence.”

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PPS A Yearlong Series Begins: Adrian Benepe – November 14, 2013

A Yearlong Series Begins: Join Us For The First Conversation On Open Space And Public Land

Adrian Benepe at the Iconic and Historic Industrial Trust Building
November 14, 2013 • 5:30 – 8:00 pm
111 Westminster Street, Providence RI
FREE

File Name : DA1_8307.JPG File Size : 3.3MB (3417416 Bytes) Date Taken : 2006/06/23 12:00:58 Image Size : 4288 x 2848 pixels Resolution : 300 x 300 dpi Bit Depth : 8 bits/channel Protection Attribute : Off Hide Attribute : Off Camera ID : N/A Camera : NIKON D2X Quality Mode : N/A Metering Mode : Matrix Exposure Mode : Manual Speed Light : Yes Focal Length : 30 mm Shutter Speed : 1/250 second Aperture : F16.0 Exposure Compensation : 0 EV White Balance : N/A Lens : N/A Flash Sync Mode : N/A Exposure Difference : N/A Flexible Program : N/A Sensitivity : N/A Sharpening : N/A Image Type : Color Color Mode : N/A Hue Adjustment : N/A Saturation Control : N/A Tone Compensation : N/A Latitude(GPS) : N/A Longitude(GPS) : N/A Altitude(GPS) : N/AKicking off the Providence Preservation Society’s yearlong series on downtown Providence and the making of great cities is Adrian Benepe, former New York City Parks Commissioner and now Senior Vice President and Director of City Park Development at the Trust for Public Land. He will lead us in discussing the benefit and potential for open space and public land.

Adrian Benepe has worked in the public and non-profit realm as a leader in park and public space conservation, design, construction and operation, in the areas of city planning, arts, culture, historic preservation, and landscape and urban design for his entire career. As Parks Commissioner of the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation under Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, he oversaw public-private partnerships that catalyzed the development of several signature city parks, including the High Line and Brooklyn Bridge Park. During his 12-year tenure, he created 730 new acres of parks and public space in NYC, and refurbished a number of existing ones. In 2012, Benepe became Senior Vice President and Director of City Park Development for The Trust for Public Land and oversees the urban work of over thirty offices whose projects include parks, playgrounds, gardens, trails and greenways across the United States. Benepe earned a B.A. in English Literature from Middlebury College and a Master’s Degree in Journalism from Columbia University, where he was awarded a Pulitzer Fellowship.

A Conversation with Adrian Benepe is a collaboration between the Providence Preservation Society and the Downtown Providence Parks Conservancy.

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Notes from the PPS Symposium Morning Session

The Cove, Providence

The Cove in Providence in 1889 looking northeast as seen from today’s Kennedy Plaza. Photo (cc) Providence Public Library

The Providence Preservation Society Symposium, Make No Little Plans started today, and I was there, scribbling down notes. If you follow @gcpvd on Twitter then you caught some of it, and I’ll be Twittering again at the afternoon session.

The presentation was “By the Cask or Smaller Quantity: Providence’s Waterfront and the World the Merchant’s Made” by C. Morgan Grefe the Executive Director of the Rhode Island Historical Society. Ms. Grefe spoke about the period from Roger Williams’ settlement through the slave trading and China trade periods to just before the start of the Industrial Revolution.

I’m going to basically type my notes as scribbled down expanding what I can remember or my impressions as I can:

  • In the hundred years before 1790 Providence’s population increased from a sleepy town of under 1,000 to a city of 10,000.
  • Newport was wrecked during the American Revolution while Providence remained largely untouched, allowing Providence to take over Newport’s lead on the title of Rhode Island’s primary city (remember, through 1900, Providence and Newport were co-capitals of Rhode Island).
  • From Roger William’s time through the 18th century Providence’s urban form was mixed use. Though the town had a small population until the end of the city, it was densely settled with no separation of work, live, and recreation areas. The people of that time would have to testify to how they felt about that.
  • The early city was laid out linearly along the east bank of the Providence River and into The Cove with tall masted ships making their way almost as far as what is now College Street and other ships reaching near to where Smith Street is now. Trade and port activity took place at the wharves along South Water Street. Other merchant activity and housing climbed the hill toward Benefit Street.
  • John Brown built his house on Benefit Street so he could keep track of all the port activity from that vantage point near the top of the hill.
  • Continue Reading →

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