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2014 Rhode Island Statewide Ballot Questions

election-2014

The Rhode Island Secretary of State’s Office has released the 2014 Voter Information Handbook . Below is the information about the seven statewide ballot questions which will appear on your November 4th ballot. There’s a lot of reading here to do before you head to the polls.


Question 1 – State Constitutional Approval

Approval of an Act authorizing state-operated casino gaming at Newport Grand in the city of Newport

(Section 22 of Article VI of the Constitution)

Shall an act be approved which would authorize the facility known as “Newport Grand” in the city of Newport to add state-operated casino gaming, such as table games, to the types of gambling it offers only and exclusively at the facility located at 150 Admiral Kalbfus Road, Newport?

Explanation for Question 1

State Constitutional Approval
(Approval of an act authorizing state-operated casino gaming at Newport Grand in the city of Newport)

Purpose and Explanation: What would approval of this question do?

In order to reduce the potential adverse effects on State revenues from competition that may come from casino gaming facilities authorized in Southeast Massachusetts, the General Assembly has adopted Chapter 436 of the Public Laws of 2014 to amend Chapter 61.2 of Title 42 of the Rhode Island General Laws entitled “Video Lottery Terminal”. The amendment to Chapter 61.2 of Title 42 of the Rhode Island General Laws authorizes the licensed video lottery terminal retailer known as “Newport Grand” to engage in state-operated casino gaming at its facility located at 150 Admiral Kalbfus Road in the City of Newport; provided, however, that such act for the expansion of gambling at the facility of Newport Grand shall take effect only if:

(i) this referendum question to approve the act authorizing such expansion of gambling at the facility of Newport Grand, which is being submitted for approval by the electors of the State and the City of Newport in accordance with the requirements of Section 22 of Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution at the general election to be held in November 2014, is approved by both a majority of the electors of the State and a majority of the electors of the City of Newport voting in the referendum; and

(ii) the proposed amendment to Section 22 of Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution that is set forth as Question 2 in the statewide referendum to be voted upon in the general election to be held in November 2014 is approved by a majority of the electors of the State voting in the referendum.

Section 22 of Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution provides that no act expanding the types of gambling permitted within any city or town in the State of Rhode Island shall take effect until it has been approved by a majority of those electors voting in a statewide referendum and by the majority of those electors voting in a referendum in the municipality in which the proposed gambling would be allowed. The proposed amendment to Section 22 of Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution that is set forth as Question 2 in the statewide referendum to be voted upon in the general election to be held in November 2014 requires that prior to a change in location of gambling that has been permitted in any city or town by approval of a referendum in such city or town on or after November 4, 2014, there must be a referendum in such city or town and approval by the majority of those electors voting in the referendum on such proposed change in location in the city or town. For a further discussion of this proposed amendment to Section 22 of Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution, please review the “Explanation for Question 2” set forth in this Voter Information Handbook 2014.

Approval of the act authorizing Newport Grand to engage in state-operated casino gaming will result in Newport Grand being authorized to engage in state-operated casino gaming at its facility located at 150 Admiral Kalbfus Road in the City of Newport in accordance with the legislation adopted by the General Assembly. However, even if a majority of the electors of the State vote to approve such authorization for Newport Grand to engage in state-operated casino gaming at its facility located at 150 Admiral Kalbfus Road in the City of Newport, such authorization will not take effect unless: (a) a majority of the electors of the City of Newport voting also approve such referendum question; and (b) a majority of the electors of the State voting approve Question 2 in the statewide referendum being voted upon in the general election to be held in November 2014.

In connection with the general election in November 2012 and pursuant to Section 22 of Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution, referendum questions were presented to the electors statewide and the electors in the Town of Lincoln to authorize an act to allow the licensed video lottery terminal retailer known as “Twin River” to engage in casino gaming at its facility in the Town of Lincoln and referendum questions were presented to the electors statewide and in the City of Newport to authorize an act to allow the licensed video lottery terminal retailer known as “Newport Grand” to engage in casino gaming at its facility in the City of Newport. Although a majority of the electors of the State voting approved such referenda questions and a majority of the electors in the Town of Lincoln voting approved the referendum question with respect to Twin River, a majority of the electors in the City of Newport voting on the referendum question with respect to Newport Grand did not approve the question. As a result, the act to authorize the licensed video retailer known as “Twin River” to engage in casino gaming at its facility in the Town of Lincoln went into effect but the act to authorize the licensed video retailer known as “Newport Grand” to engage in casino gaming at its facility in the City of Newport did not go into effect. The conditions for the act now being considered to take effect that would authorize the license video retailer “Newport Grand” to engage in casino gaming at its facility in the City of Newport differ from the conditions for the prior act in 2012 to take effect in that this act is not only conditioned upon the satisfaction of the requirements of Section 22 of Article VI of the Constitution but also a majority of the electors voting statewide having approved the amendment to Section 22 of Article VI provided for by Question 2 in the statewide referendum.

Chapter 61.2 of Title 42 of the Rhode Island General Laws, as amended, provides that the State of Rhode Island is authorized, subject to the restrictions of Section 22 of Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution, to operate, conduct and control casino gaming at Newport Grand to the extent Newport Grand is authorized to engage in casino gaming. It goes on to provide that the State of Rhode Island, through the Lottery Division and/or the Department of Business Regulation, shall have full operational control to operate the Newport Grand facility and the authority to make all decisions about all aspects of the functioning of the business enterprise, including, without limitation, the power and authority to:

(1) Determine the number, type, placement and arrangement of casino gaming games, tables and sites within the facility;
(2) Establish with respect to casino gaming one or more systems for linking, tracking, deposit and reporting of receipts, audits, annual reports, prohibitive conduct and other such matters determined from time to time;
(3) Collect all receipts from casino gaming, require that Newport Grand collect casino gaming gross receipts in trust for the State of Rhode Island through the Lottery Division, deposit such receipts into an account or accounts of its choice, allocate such receipts according to law, and otherwise maintain custody and control over all casino gaming receipts and funds;
(4) Hold and exercise sufficient powers over Newport Grand’s accounting and finances to allow for adequate oversight and verification of the financial aspects of casino gaming at the facility;
(5) Monitor all casino gaming operations and have the power to terminate or suspend any casino gaming activities in the event of an integrity concern or other threat to the public trust;
(6) Define and limit the rules of play and odds of authorized casino gaming games, including, without limitation, the minimum and maximum wagers for each casino gaming game;
(7) Have approval rights over matters relating to the employment of individuals to be involved, directly or indirectly, with the operation of casino gaming at Newport Grand;
(8) Establish compulsive gambling treatment programs;
(9) Promulgate, or propose for promulgation, any legislative, interpretive and procedural rules necessary for the successful implementation, administration and enforcement of Chapter 61.2 of Title 42 of the Rhode Island General Laws; and
(10) Hold all other powers necessary and proper to fully effectively execute and administer the provisions of Chapter 61.2 of Title 42 of the Rhode Island General Laws for its purpose of allowing the State of Rhode Island to operate a casino gaming facility through a licensed video lottery retailer hosting said casino gaming on behalf of the State of Rhode Island.

In order to further protect State gaming revenues and maintain the competitiveness of Newport Grand and the State’s other gaming facility, Twin River, in 2012 the General Assembly adopted legislation called the Revenue Protection Act to address, among other things, the share of net table game revenues to be received by the State if casino gaming is approved, the share of video lottery terminal revenue to be received by the City of Newport going forward, incentive gaming programs to protect market share and mitigate the potential impact of casino gaming in Massachusetts, and a regulatory framework to ensure oversight of casino gaming by the Lottery Division.

The Revenue Protection Act, as amended by Chapter 436 of the Public Laws of 2014, establishes the State of Rhode Island’s share of net table game revenues from Newport Grand to be 18 per cent of such revenues, which is consistent with the State’s percentage share of net table game revenues received from Twin River. The State received for fiscal year 2013 approximately 61.67% of net terminal income from video lottery terminals at Newport Grand. The State’s percentage share of revenues from table games at Newport Grand is significantly less than the State’s percentage share of revenues from video lottery terminals because the operational expenses relating to table games to be paid by Newport Grand, LLC are substantially higher than the operational expenses relating to video lottery terminals.

The Revenue Protection Act, as amended by Chapter 436 of the Public Laws of 2014, does not change the share of net terminal income received by Newport Grand, LLC from video lottery terminals at Newport Grand but it does provide for a change in the share of net terminal income to the City of Newport. The Revenue Protection Act, as amended, provides that, effective as of July 1, 2015, provided that this referendum question is approved by a majority of the electors voting statewide and in the City of Newport, and provided that Question 2 is approved by a majority of the electors voting statewide, the City of Newport’s allocation of net terminal income from authorized video lottery terminals at the Newport Grand shall increase from one and one hundredth percent (1.01%) to one and forty-five hundredths percent (1.45%) of such net terminal income. Furthermore, if, in addition to this referendum question being approved by a majority of the electors voting statewide and in the City of Newport and Question 2 being approved by a majority of the electors voting statewide, (i) Newport Grand, LLC or its successor has made an investment of no less than forty million dollars ($40,000,000) exclusive of acquisition costs within three (3) years, (ii) a certificate of completion and final approval from the city building inspector has been issued for the facility upgraded through this investment, (iii) the number of video lottery terminals in operation is no fewer than those in operation as of January 1, 2014 and (iv) table gaming has commenced in Newport, then the City of Newport’s allocation of net terminal income of authorized video lottery terminals at Newport Grand shall be the greater of one million dollars ($1,000,000) or one and forty-five hundredths percent (1.45%) of such net terminal income, except that for six (6) consecutive full fiscal years immediately thereafter, the allocation shall be the greater of one million five hundred thousand dollars ($1,500,000) or one and forty-five hundredths percent (1.45%) of net terminal income of authorized video lottery terminals at Newport Grand. Such minimum distribution shall be distributed in twelve (12) equal payments during the fiscal year.

To review the provisions of the Revenue Protection Act in their entirety and their effect as it relates to table games and video lottery terminals at Newport Grand should this referendum question be approved by a majority of the electors voting statewide and in the City of Newport and should Question 2 be approved by a majority of the electors voting statewide, we refer you to the legislation enacted under Chapter 436 of the Public Laws of 2014 and Chapters 289 and 290 of the Public Laws of 2012.

A vote to “Approve” this question means you wish to approve the act authorizing Newport Grand to add state- operated casino gaming, such as table games, to the types of gambling it offers only and exclusively at its facility located at 150 Admiral Kalbfus Road in the City of Newport in accordance with the provisions of such act.

A vote to “Reject” this question means you do not approve the act authorizing Newport Grand to add state- operated casino gaming, such as table games, to the types of gaming it offers only and exclusively at its facility located at 150 Admiral Kalbfus Road in the City of Newport in accordance with the provisions of such act.

How much money will be borrowed?
The referendum would not authorize any borrowing.


Question 2 – Amendment to the Constitution of the State

Restriction on Gambling

(Section 1 of Article XIV of the Constitution)

Approval of the amendment to Section 22 of Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution set forth below will provide that no change in the location of gambling permitted in a municipality would occur without the further approval of the majority of those electors voting on said proposed location change in a referendum within said municipality:

Full text of amendment for Question 2:

Section 22 of Article VI of the Constitution shall be amended to read as follows:

Section 22. Restriction on gambling.

No act expanding the types or locations of gambling which are permitted within the state or within any city or town therein or expanding municipalities in which a particular form of gambling is authorized shall take effect until it has been approved by the majority of those electors voting in a statewide referendum and by the majority of those electors voting in said referendum in the municipality in which the proposed gambling would be allowed and, having been so approved in said referendum in any city or town on or after November 4, 2014, the location where the gambling is permitted in any city or town shall not be changed within said city or town without the approval of the majority of those electors voting on said proposed change in a referendum in said city or town.

The secretary of state shall certify the results of the statewide referendum and the local board of canvassers of the city or town where the gambling is to be allowed shall certify the results of the local referendum to the secretary of state.

Explanation for Question 2

Amendment to the Constitution of the State
(Restriction on Gambling)

Purpose and Explanation: What would approval of this question do?

In 1994 the Constitution of Rhode Island was amended to add Section 22 of Article VI to provide that no act expanding the types of gambling permitted within the State or within any city or town therein or expanding the municipalities in which a particular form of gambling is authorized can take effect until it has been approved by a majority of statewide electors voting in a statewide referendum and by the majority of those electors voting in a referendum in the municipality where the proposed gambling would be allowed.

The General Assembly has proposed by joint resolution an amendment to Section 22 of Article VI of the Constitution in accordance with the provisions of Section 1 of Article XIV of the Constitution for approval by the State’s electors. If approved, the proposed amendment to the Constitution referenced below will have the effect of providing that no change in the location of gambling permitted in a municipality would occur without the further approval of the majority of those electors voting on said proposed location change in a referendum within said municipality.

Section 22 of Article VI of the Rhode Island Constitution shall be amended to read as follows:

Section 22. Restriction on gambling.
No act expanding the types or locations of gambling which are permitted within the state or within any city or town therein or expanding municipalities in which a particular form of gambling is authorized shall take effect until it has been approved by the majority of those electors voting in a statewide referendum and by the majority of those electors voting in a said referendum in the municipality in which the proposed gambling would be allowed and, having been so approved in said referendum in any city or town on or after November 4, 2014, the location where the gambling is permitted in any city or town shall not be changed within said city or town without approval of the majority of those electors voting on said proposed change in a referendum in said city or town.

The secretary of state shall certify the results of the statewide referendum and the local board of canvassers of the city or town where the gambling is to be allowed shall certify the results of the local referendum to the secretary of state.

The words and phrases in the proposed amendment to the Constitution set forth above that have been crossed- out are words and phrases currently found in Section 22 of Article VI of the Constitution that would be removed by the amendment. The words and phrases in the proposed amendment to the Constitution set forth above that have been underlined are words and phrases that are not currently found in Section 22 of Article VI of the Constitution that would be added by the amendment.

The approval of the act authorizing the facility known as “Newport Grand” in the City of Newport to add state- operated casino gaming, such as table games, to the types of gambling offered as provided for by Question 1 in the statewide referendum can only take place if, in addition to approval of such Question 1 by a majority of those electors voting statewide and those electors voting in the City of Newport, a majority of those electors voting statewide also approve this Question 2 in the statewide referendum being voted upon in the general election to be held in November 2014.

A vote to “Approve” means that no change in location of gambling permitted in a city or town by approval of a referendum in such city or town on or after November 4, 2014 would occur without the further approval of the majority of those electors voting on said proposed location change in a referendum within said city or town.

A vote to “Reject” means that a change in location of gambling permitted in a city or town would occur without the further approval of the majority of those electors voting on said proposed location change in a referendum within said city or town.

How much money will be borrowed?
The referendum would not authorize any borrowing.


Question 3 – Constitutional Convention

(Section 2 of Article XIV of the Constitution)

Shall there be a convention to amend or revise the Constitution?

Explanation for Question 3

Constitutional Convention

Purpose and Explanation: What would approval of this question do?

The General Assembly has submitted the following question to the State’s electors:

Shall there be a convention to amend or revise the Constitution?
A Constitutional Convention is an assembly of delegates or representatives of the people of the State for the purpose of amending or revising the Rhode Island Constitution. A Constitutional Convention, if held, could propose an entirely new Constitution for adoption or rejection by the State’s electors; it could propose individual amendments to the Constitution; or it could re-write the basic document while presenting what appears to be the most controversial issues to the electors in the form of supplemental amendments, thus allowing individual decisions on each.

No amendment or revision to the Constitution agreed upon by a Constitutional Convention shall take effect until the amendments or revisions have been submitted to the electors of the State and approved by a majority of those electors voting.

In accordance with Section 2 of Article XIV of the Rhode Island Constitution, a bi-partisan preparatory commission has been created by the General Assembly to assemble information on constitutional questions
for the electors of the State. The preparatory commission made use of such sources and gathered information pertinent to the fulfillment of its charge as it deemed appropriate. The preparatory commission, after gathering information on particular issues that the State’s electors may consider, reported its findings to the Governor, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the President of the Senate, and to the public, through the news media.

If a majority of the State’s electors vote to hold a Constitutional Convention, then it will be the responsibility of the 2015 General Assembly to enact legislation determining the method of election of delegates, setting forth an election schedule, and appropriating funds. The number of delegates shall be equal to the number of members of the House of Representatives and shall be apportioned in the same manner as the members of the House of Representatives. The parameters of a Constitutional Convention would be decided by the General Assembly and the elected delegates to the Convention. The last Constitutional Convention was held in 1986.

The actual cost to the taxpayers of conducting a Convention in 2016 is unknown. However, the bi-partisan preparatory commission for the proposed Constitutional Convention that met in July and August 2014, reported that the projected cost to the taxpayers of holding a Constitutional Convention in 2016 would be approximately Two and One-half Million Dollars, ($2.5M), after adjusting 1986 costs for inflation and in anticipation of numerous factors that could increase the cost of a convention to include the total number and location of convention meetings, the expense of hired experts, as well as the cost of a staff necessary to assist delegates in carrying out their duties.

A copy of the complete report issued by the bi-partisan preparatory commission presenting its findings, including information on issues that may be considered by the Constitutional Convention and the projected costs to taxpayers of holding a Constitutional Convention in 2016, may be viewed on the website of the Rhode Island General Assembly (www.rilin.state.ri.us) or a copy of the report may be obtained from the Rhode Island Library, State House Room 208, Providence, RI 02903.

This question has been proposed by the General Assembly of the State pursuant to Section 2 of Article XIV of the Rhode Island Constitution, which gives the General Assembly the right to submit to the electors at any election the question, “Shall there be a convention to amend or revise the Constitution?” If the General Assembly fails to submit the question to the electors of the State during any ten year period, then the Secretary of State shall submit it at the next general election following such period.

A vote to “Approve” means you would like to see a Constitutional Convention called to amend or revise the Constitution.

A vote to “Reject” means that you are opposed to a Constitutional Convention called to amend or revise the Constitution at this time.

How much money will be borrowed?
The referendum would not authorize any borrowing.


Question 4 – Higher Education Facilities Bonds

$125,000,000
(Chapter 145 – Public Laws 2014)

Approval of this question will allow the State of Rhode Island to issue general obligation bonds, refunding bonds, and temporary notes in an amount not to exceed one hundred twenty-five million dollars ($125,000,000) to construct a new College of Engineering building and undertake supporting renovations. The new building will anchor the northwest corner of the Engineering Quadrangle on the Kingston Campus and provide contemporary and state-of- the-art instructional and research facilities. As part of this project, outdated engineering buildings will be taken out of service and razed.

Explanation for Question 4

Higher Education Facilities Bonds

Purpose: What will the higher education facilities bonds do?

Approval and issuance of these bonds will provide funds to the State of Rhode Island to construct a new College of Engineering building and supporting renovations. The new building will anchor the northwest corner of the Engineering Quadrangle on the Kingston Campus of the University of Rhode Island and provide contemporary and state-of-the-art instructional and research facilities. As part of this project, outdated engineering buildings will be taken out of service and razed.

How much money will be borrowed?
$125,000,000

Explanation: How will the money be spent?

$125,000,000 will be used to construct a new College of Engineering building and supporting renovations, and to take out of service and raze outdated engineering buildings.

Project time table:
The program to construct a new College of Engineering building and supporting renovations, and to take out of service and raze outdated engineering buildings, is expected to commence on or about February 1, 2015 and be completed on or about June 30, 2019.

Useful life:
The Rhode Island Board of Education estimates that the useful life of the new College of Engineering building and supporting renovations will be approximately 50 years.

Project Costs Principle: $124,500,000
Interest**: $58,718,558
Cost of Issuance* Principle: $500,000
Interest**: $235,818
Total Project and Issuance Costs Principle: $125,000,000
Interest**: $58,954,376
Total Costs: $183,954,376

* Cost of issuance estimated at 0.4% of principal issued.
** Assumes an interest rate of 4%, with bonds amortized with level payments over twenty years.


Question 5 – Creative and Cultural Economy Bonds
$35,000,000

(a) Cultural Arts and the Economy Grant Program: $30,000,000
1. Trinity Repertory Company: $4,647,750
2. Rhode Island Philharmonic: $2,390,250
3. Newport Performing Arts Center: $4,216,800
4. United Theater/Westerly Land Trust: $2,369,440
5. The Chorus of Westerly: $1,054,200
6. The Stadium Theater Conservatory in Woonsocket: $2,108,400
7. 2nd Story Theater: $1,054,200
8. AS220: $2,108,400
9. WaterFire Providence: $3,162,600
10. Other funds to be allocated by RISCA: $6,887,960
(b) State Preservation Grants Program: $5,000,000

Full text for Question 5:

Creative and Cultural Economy Bonds
$35,000,000
(Chapter 145 – Public Laws 2014)

Approval of this question will authorize the State of Rhode Island to issue general obligation bonds, refunding bonds, and temporary notes in an amount not to exceed thirty-five million dollars ($35,000,000) to fund capital improvement, preservation and renovation projects for public and nonprofit artistic, performance centers, historic sites, museums and cultural art centers located throughout the State of Rhode Island, to be allotted as follows:

(a) Cultural Arts and the Economy Grant Program $30,000,000
Provides funds for 1:1 matching grants for a new Cultural Arts and the Economy Grant program to be administered by the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts for capital improvement, preservation and renovation projects for public and nonprofit artistic, performance centers and cultural art centers located throughout the State of Rhode Island.

1. Trinity Repertory Company – $4,647,750
For the Lederer Theater and the Pell Chafee Performance Center, both in Providence, used for performance facilities, educational instruction, production and administration, including reimbursements of advances of up to $1,500,000 expended for ongoing fire code upgrades.

2. Rhode Island Philharmonic – $2,390,250
For the Carter Center for Music Education and Performance in East Providence, used for music teaching, learning, performance and administration.

3. Newport Performing Arts Center – $4,216,800
For the Opera House in Newport for use as a multi-cultural performing arts and educational facility.

4. United Theater/Westerly Land Trust – $2,369,440
For the United Theater in Westerly for use as space for performing arts, fine arts showcase, arts instruction, cinema, public television station and program administration.

5. The Chorus of Westerly – $1,054,200
For the George Kent Performance Hall in Westerly for music and arts performance, teaching and rehearsal space, administrative and community function space.

6. The Stadium Theater Conservatory in Woonsocket – $2,108,400
For set construction, costuming, rehearsal, voice, acting and dance studios and administrative spaces.

7. 2nd Story Theater – $1,054,200
For performance venues in Warren, including concessions studio/classroom space, set construction shop and administrative offices.

8. AS220 – $2,108,400
For AS220’s facilities in Providence used for performing arts, dance studio, youth and adult education, gallery and artist live/work space.

9. WaterFire Providence – $3,162,600
To develop a 27,000 square foot historic warehouse in the Valley/Olneyville neighborhood into its headquarters, multi-use community arts center, visitor center, education center and arts and creative industries incubator.

10. Other funds to be allocated by RISCA – $6,887,960
For 1:1 matching grants to be allocated by the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts to 501(c)(3) nonprofit cultural organizations which lease or own their performance space, and for RISCA’s expenses in administering the program. In awarding such grants RISCA shall take into account financial need, the availability or actual expenditure of matching funds for the projects, available gifts or grants for projects, the amount of square footage to be improved, the geographical location and characteristics of audiences benefitted.

(b) State Preservation Grants Program – $5,000,000
Provide funds to cities, towns and non-profit organizations to preserve, renovate and improve public and nonprofit historic sites, museums, and cultural art centers located in historic structures in the State of Rhode Island to be administered by the Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission.

Explanation for Question 5

Creative And Cultural Economy Bonds

Purpose: What will the creative and cultural economy bonds do?

Approval and issuance of these bonds will provide funds for capital improvement, preservation and renovation projects for public and nonprofit artistic centers, performance centers, historic sites, museums and cultural art centers located throughout the State of Rhode Island, as follows:

(a) Cultural Arts and the Economy Grant Program
1:1 matching grants for a new Cultural Arts and the Economy Grant program to be administered by the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts for capital improvement, preservation and renovation projects for public and nonprofit artistic centers, performance centers and cultural art centers located throughout the State of Rhode Island as follows:

1. Trinity Repertory Company
For the Lederer Theater and the Pell Chafee Performance Center, both in Providence, used for performance facilities, educational instruction, production and administration, including reimbursements of advances of up to $1,500,000 expended for ongoing fire code upgrades.

2. Rhode Island Philharmonic
For the Carter Center for Music Education and Performance in East Providence, used for music teaching, learning, performance and administration.

3. Newport Performing Arts Center
For the Opera House in Newport for use as a multi-cultural performing arts and educational facility.

4. United Theater/Westerly Land Trust
For the United Theater in Westerly for use as space for performing arts, fine arts showcase, arts instruction, cinema, public television station and program administration.

5. The Chorus of Westerly
For the George Kent Performance Hall in Westerly for music and arts performance, teaching and rehearsal space and administrative and community function space.

6. The Stadium Theater Conservatory in Woonsocket
For set construction, costuming, rehearsal, voice, acting and dance studios and administrative spaces.

7. 2nd Story Theater
For performance venues in Warren, including concessions, studio/classroom space, set construction shop and administrative offices.

8. AS220
For AS220’s facilities in Providence used for performing arts, dance studio, youth and adult education, gallery and artist live/work space.

9. WaterFire Providence
To develop a 27,000 square foot historic warehouse in the Valley/Olneyville neighborhood into its headquarters, multi- use community arts center, visitor center, education center and arts and creative industries incubator.

10. Other funds to be allocated by RISCA
For 1:1 matching grants to be allocated by the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts to 501(c)(3) nonprofit cultural organizations which lease or own their performance space, and for RISCA’s expenses in administering the program.

(b) State Preservation Grants Program
Providing funds to cities, towns and non-profit organizations to preserve, renovate and improve public and nonprofit historic sites, museums, and cultural art centers located in historic structures in the State of Rhode Island to be administered by the Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission.

How much money will be borrowed?
$35,000,000

Explanation: How will the money be spent?
(a) Cultural Arts and the Economy Grant Program: $30,000,000 will be used to provide funds for 1:1 matching grants for a new Cultural Arts and the Economy Grant program to be administered by the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts for capital improvement, preservation and renovation projects for public and nonprofit artistic centers, performance centers and cultural art centers located throughout the State of Rhode Island, allotted as follows:

1. Trinity Repertory Company: $4,647,750 will be used to provide funds for the Lederer Theater and the Pell Chafee Performance Center, both in Providence, for performance facilities, educational instruction, production and administration, including reimbursements of advances of up to $1,500,000 expended for ongoing fire code upgrades.

2. Rhode Island Philharmonic: $2,390,250 will be used to provide funds for the Carter Center for Music Education and Performance in East Providence, for music teaching, learning, performance and administration.
3. Newport Performing Arts Center: $4,216,800 will be used to provide funds for the Opera House in Newport for use as a multi-cultural performing arts and educational facility.
4. United Theater/Westerly Land Trust: $2,369,440 will be used to provide funds for the United Theater in Westerly for use as space for performing arts, fine arts showcase, arts instruction, cinema, public television station and program administration.
5. The Chorus of Westerly: $1,054,200 will be used to provide funds for the George Kent Performance Hall in Westerly for music and arts performance, teaching and rehearsal space and administrative and community function space.
6. The Stadium Theater Conservatory in Woonsocket: $2,108,400 will be used to provide funds for set construction, costuming, rehearsal, voice, acting and dance studios and administrative spaces. More specifically, the funds will be used to improve, preserve and renovate the Stadium Theatre Performing Arts Centre campus located in Woonsocket, which includes the Grand Hall, lobby, arcade, Marquee room, Conservatory and grounds, and performance, production, rehearsal, educational instruction and administrative facilities.
7. 2nd Story Theater: $1,054,200 will be used to provide funds for performance venues in Warren, including concessions, studio/classroom space, set construction shop and administrative offices.
8. AS220: $2,108,400 will be used to provide funds for AS220’s facilities in Providence used for performing arts, dance studio, youth and adult education, gallery and artist live/work space.
9. WaterFire Providence: $3,162,600 will be used to provide funds for WaterFire Providence to develop a 27,000 square foot historic warehouse in the Valley/Olneyville neighborhood into its headquarters, multi-use community arts center, visitor center, education center and arts and creative industries incubator.
10. Other funds to be allocated by RISCA: $6,887,960 will be used to provide funds for 1:1 matching grants to be allocated by the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts to 501(c)(3) nonprofit cultural organizations which lease or own their performance space, and for RISCA’s expenses in administering the program.
(b) State Preservation Grants Program: $5,000,000 will be used to provide funds to cities, towns and non-profit organizations to preserve, renovate and improve public and nonprofit historic sites, museums, and cultural art centers located in historic structures in the State of Rhode Island to be administered by the Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission. The Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission expects the funds to be provided to such cities, towns and non-profit organizations in the form of matching grants.

Project time table:
The funding of the grants under the Cultural and the Economy Grant Program to be administered by the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts is expected to commence in 2015 and to be completed within five (5) years.
The funding of grants under the State Preservation Grants Program to be administered by the Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission is expected to commence in 2015 and to be completed within five (5) years.

Useful life:
The Rhode Island State Council on the Arts estimates the useful life of the facilities, improvements, equipment and other property resulting from the capital improvement, preservation and renovation projects of public and nonprofit artistic centers, performance centers and cultural art centers to be funded through the Cultural and the Economy Grant Program to range from five (5) to forty (40) years with an estimated average useful life of approximately twenty (20) to twenty-five (25) years.

The Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission estimates the useful life of the facilities, improvements and other property resulting from the preservation, renovation and improvement of the public and nonprofit historic sites, museums, and cultural art centers located in historic structures in the State of Rhode Island to be funded through the State Preservation Grants Program to range from twenty-five (25) years to forty (40) years.

Total cost:

Project Costs Principle: $34,860,000
Interest**: $16,441,196
Cost of Issuance* Principle: $140,000
Interest**: $66,029
Total Project and Issuance Costs Principle: $35,000,000
Interest**: $16,507,225
Total Costs: $51,507,225

* Cost of issuance estimated at 0.4% of principal issued.
** Assumes an interest rate of 4%, with bonds amortized with level payments over twenty years.


Question 6 – Mass Transit Hub Infrastructure Bonds

$35,000,000

Full text for Question 6:

Mass Transit Hub Infrastructure Bonds
$35,000,000
(Chapter 145 – Public Laws 2014)

Approval of this question will allow the State of Rhode Island to issue general obligation bonds, refunding bonds, and temporary notes in an amount not to exceed thirty-five million dollars ($35,000,000) to fund enhancements and renovations to mass transit hub infrastructure throughout the State of Rhode Island to improve access to multiple intermodal sites, key transportation, healthcare, and other locations.

Explanation for Question 6

Mass Transit Hub Infrastructure Bonds

Purpose: What will the mass transit hub infrastructure bonds do?

Approval and issuance of these bonds will provide funds to the Department of Transportation for enhancements and renovations to mass transit hub infrastructure throughout the State of Rhode Island, which is intended to improve access to multiple intermodal sites, key transportation, healthcare, and other locations. The availability of these funds may also provide leverage for possibly securing additional revenue for the mass transit infrastructure projects from federal and private partners.

How much money will be borrowed?
$35,000,000

Explanation: How will the money be spent?
$35,000,000 will be used to enhance and renovate mass transit hub infrastructure throughout the State of Rhode Island, which is intended to improve access to multiple intermodal sites, key transportation, healthcare, and other locations. The availability of these funds may also provide leverage for possibly securing additional revenue for the mass transit infrastructure projects from federal and private partners.

Project time table:
The program to fund enhancements and renovations to mass transit hub infrastructure throughout the State of Rhode Island is expected to commence in 2016 and be completed by 2019.

Useful life:
The Department of Transportation estimates that the useful life of the enhancements and renovations to be made to mass transit hub infrastructure throughout the State of Rhode Island will be approximately 50 years.

Total cost:

Project Costs Principle: $34,860,000
Interest**: $16,441,196
Cost of Issuance* Principle: $140,000
Interest**: $66,029
Total Project and Issuance Costs Principle: $35,000,000
Interest**: $16,507,225
Total Costs: $51,507,225

* Cost of issuance estimated at 0.4% of principal issued.
** Assumes an interest rate of 4%, with bonds amortized with level payments over twenty years.


Question 7 – Clean Water, Open Space, and Healthy Communities Bonds

$53,000,000

$3,000,000

(a) Brownfield Remediation and Economic Development: $5,000,000
(b) Flood Prevention:
(c) Farmland Acquisition: $3,000,000
(d) Local Recreation Grants: $4,000,000
(e) Roger Williams Park Zoo: $15,000,000
(f) Roger Williams Park: $3,000,000
(g) Clean Water Finance Agency: $20,000,000

Full text for Question 7:

Clean Water, Open Space, and Healthy Communities Bonds
$53,000,000
(Chapter 145 – Public Laws 2014)

Approval of this question will allow the State of Rhode Island to issue general obligation bonds, refunding bonds, and temporary notes in an amount not to exceed fifty-three million dollars ($53,000,000) for environmental and recreational purposes, to be allotted as follows:

(a) Brownfield Remediation and Economic Development – $5,000,000
Provides up to eighty percent (80%) matching grants to public, private, and/or non-profit entities for brownfield remediation projects.

(b) Flood Prevention – $3,000,000
To provide grants to public and/or non-profit entities for project design and construction grants for repairing and/or removing dams, restoring and/or improving resiliency of vulnerable coastal habitats, and restoring rivers and stream floodplains.

(c) Farmland Acquisition – $3,000,000
Provides funds to protect the state’s working farms.

(d) Local Recreation Grants – $4,000,000
Provides up to eighty percent (80%) matching grant funds to municipalities to acquire, develop or rehabilitate local recreational facilities to meet the growing needs for active recreational facilities.

(e) Roger Williams Park Zoo – $15,000,000
Provides funds for improvements and renovations to the Roger Williams Park Zoo.

(f) Roger Williams Park – $3,000,000
Provides funds for improvements and renovations to the Roger Williams Park.

(g) Clean Water Finance Agency – $20,000,000
Provides funds to finance water pollution abatement infrastructure projects.

Explanation for Question 7

Explanation for Question 7:

Clean Water, Open Space, and Healthy Communities Bonds

Purpose: What will the clean water, open space, and healthy communities bonds do?

Approval and issuance of these bonds will provide funds to the State of Rhode Island for the following environmental and recreational purposes:

(a) Brownfield Remediation and Economic Development – Provides up to eighty percent (80%) matching grants to public, private, and/or non-profit entities for brownfield remediation projects. Brownfield remediation projects involve the environmental clean-up and reuse of contaminated properties.
(b) Flood Prevention – Provides grants to public and/or non-profit entities for project design and construction grants for repairing and/or removing dams, restoring and/or improving resiliency of vulnerable coastal habitats, and restoring rivers and stream floodplains.
(c) Farmland Acquisition – Provides funds to protect the state’s working farms.
(d) Local Recreation Grants – Provides up to eighty percent (80%) matching grant funds to municipalities to acquire, develop or rehabilitate local recreational facilities to meet the growing needs for active recreational facilities.
(e) Roger Williams Park Zoo – Provides funds for new exhibits, a new education center and other improvements and renovations to the Roger Williams Park Zoo.
(f) Roger Williams Park – Provides funds for improvements and renovations to the Roger Williams Park.
(g) Clean Water Finance Agency – Provides funds to finance water pollution abatement infrastructure projects.

How much money will be borrowed?
$53,000,000

Explanation: How will the money be spent?
(a) Brownfield Remediation and Economic Development: $5,000,000 will be used to provide up to eighty percent (80%) matching grants to public, private, and/or non-profit entities for brownfield remediation projects. Brownfield remediation projects involve the environmental clean-up and reuse of contaminated properties.
(b) Flood Prevention: $3,000,000 will be used to provide grants to public and/or non-profit entities for project design and construction grants for repairing and/or removing dams, restoring and/or improving resiliency of vulnerable coastal habitats, and restoring rivers and stream floodplains.
(c) Farmland Acquisition: $3,000,000 will be used to provide funds to protect the state’s working farms. The Department of Environmental Management will use the funds to purchase farmland in danger of converting to non-agricultural use, then restrict and affordably sell or lease the land to qualified farmers. Funds from sale of the land to farmers will be returned to the program account for re-use in new projects. These funds may also be used for the purchase of development rights to farms by the Agricultural Preservation Commission.
(d) Local Recreation Grants: $4,000,000 will be used to provide up to eighty percent (80%) matching grant funds to municipalities to acquire, develop or rehabilitate local recreational facilities to meet the growing needs for active recreational facilities.
(e) Roger Williams Park Zoo: $15,000,000 will be used to provide funds for new exhibits, a new education center and other improvements and renovations to Roger Williams Park Zoo.
(f) Roger Williams Park: $3,000,000 will be used to provide funds for improvements and renovations to Roger Williams Park.
(g) Clean Water Finance Agency: $20,000,000 will be used to provide funds to finance water pollution abatement infrastructure projects.

Project time table:
The program to provide funding assistance for: (a) eighty percent (80%) matching grants to public, private, and/or non-profit entities for brownfield remediation projects is expected to commence in 2016 and to be completed by 2022; (b) grants to public and/or non-profit entities for project design and construction grants for repairing and/or removing dams, restoring and/or improving resiliency of vulnerable coastal habitats, and restoring rivers and stream floodplains is expected to commence in 2016 and to be completed by 2022; (c) protecting the state’s working farms is expected to commence in 2016 and to be completed by 2022; (d) up to eighty percent (80%) matching grant funds to municipalities to acquire, develop, or rehabilitate local recreational facilities to meet the growing needs for active recreational facilities is expected to commence in 2016 and to be completed by 2022; (e) improvements and renovations to the Roger Williams Park Zoo is expected to commence in 2016 and to be completed by 2018; (f) improvements and renovations to the Roger Williams Park is expected to commence in 2016 and to be completed by 2017; and (g) financing water pollution abatement infrastructure projects is expected to commence in 2016 and to be completed by 2022.

Useful life:
The Department of Environmental Management estimates the useful life of: (a) the brownsfield remediation projects to be financed will be approximately 25 years; (b) project design and construction to be financed for repairing and/or removing dams, restoring and/or improving resiliency of vulnerable coastal habitats, and restoring rivers and stream floodplains will be approximately 50 years; (c) the protection of the state’s working farms to be financed will be in perpetuity; (d) acquiring, developing, or rehabilitating local recreational facilities to meet the growing needs for active recreational facilities will be approximately 35 years; (e) improvements and renovations to the Roger Williams Park Zoo to be financed will be approximately 35 years; (f) improvements and renovations to the Roger Williams Park to be financed will be approximately 35 years; and (g) water pollution abatement infrastructure projects to be financed will be approximately 35 years.

Total cost:

Project Costs Principle: $52,788,000
Interest**: $24,896,669
Cost of Issuance* Principle: $212,000
Interest**: $99,986
Total Project and Issuance Costs Principle: $53,000,000
Interest**: $24,996,655
Total Costs: $77,996,655

* Cost of issuance estimated at 0.4% of principal issued.
** Assumes an interest rate of 4%, with bonds amortized with level payments over twenty years.

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