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Aberystwyth: The town without traffic wardens [The Telegraph]

“We’re disappointed, obviously. If you went around asking people about their pet hates, they’d probably all say ‘traffic wardens’, but here we had a chance to show that we could get by without them, and we seem to have failed.”

Everyone agrees there are lessons to be learnt. One of them is likely to be that if you give the motoring public what it says it wants, you end up not with the Big Society but a big mess.


With Few Funds Available, What are Transit Agencies to Do? [The TransportPolitic]

The timing of these discussions – premised on GOP skepticism of government spending and Democratic fears of advocating raising taxes – comes not coincidentally just a week after House Republicans revealed their proposal for a six-year transportation budget. If it was not clear last week, it is now: The cuts being proposed would be devastating to the nation’s transit agencies, depriving them of much-needed funds for the purchase of new rolling stock and the maintenance and construction of necessary facilities. Even if this plan, which would diminish already too-limited transportation funds by a third, does not get implemented, the context of the debt negotiations suggests that something much better is unlikely to be had.


Nation’s Oldest Ferry to Close [Transportation Nation]

The nation’s oldest continuously operating ferry boat service will shut down after 356 years due to budget cuts in Connecticut.

Historical archives say the Rocky Hill Ferry has been crossing the Connecticut River since 1655. It was privately operated, mostly by local families under state charter, for 260 years before being adopted by the state in 1915. It is currently operated by the Connecticut Department of Transportation.


Clockwork City [via: A|N Blog]

An imaginary city where transport systems aren’t needed, because the city districts can be transported by themselves.


Prosecuting the victim, absolving the perpetrators [Transportation for America]

The prosecution and conviction this week of Raquel Nelson – a metro Atlanta mother who lost her four-year-old son to a hit-and-run driver – on the charge of vehicular manslaughter is one of those times.

You heard that right: According to the office of Cobb County prosecutor Barry Morgan, Nelson – who had no car at the time – committed vehicular manslaughter by attempting to cross a five-lane highway with her three kids to get to her apartment, after being let off the bus.

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