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CANCELLED City Plan Commission Meeting – October 21, 2014

CPC City Plan Commission Meeting
Tuesday, October 21, 2014 – 4:45pm
444 Westminster Street, First Floor
This meeting has been cancelled

Opening Session

  • Call to Order
  • Roll Call
  • Approval of minutes from September 16, 2014 meeting – for action
  • Approval of minutes from September 30, 2014 special meeting – for action
  • Vote to elect Administrative Officer for City Plan Commission
  • Director’s Report

Major Subdivision

460-rochambeau

1. Case No. 14-031 MA – 440-460 Rochambeau Ave The applicant is requesting to subdivide two lots at 440 and 460 Rochambeau Ave. measuring approximately 33,453 SF and 114,873 SF respectively, into 12 lots. Each proposed lot would measure more than 6,000 SF – for action (AP 93 Lots 14 and 339, Blackstone)

Minor Subdivision

550-veazie

2. Case No. 14-032 MI – 550 Veazie Street The applicant is requesting to subdivide 550 Veazie Street measuring approximately 6.5 acres into two lots, each measuring approximately 3.9 acres and 3.02 acres– for action (AP 78 Lot 417, Wanskuck)

Adjournment


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Downtown Design Review Committee Meeting – September 8, 2014

featured-drc Downtown Design Review Committee
Monday, September 8, 2014 – 4:45pm
Department of Planning and Development, 1st Floor Conference Room 444 Westminster Street, Providence, RI 02903

benevolent

Image from Google Street View

Opening Session

  • Call to Order
  • Roll Call
  • Approval of Meeting Minutes of July 14, 2014

New Business

1. DRC Application No. 14.16: 1 Chestnut Street (Beneficent House) – Public Hearing Proposal by Beneficent House to replace existing exterior signage on site with a new, consistent signage system. The applicant also requests a waiver from D-1 Regulations prohibiting freestanding signs. The proposal includes the installation of two new freestanding signs, one of which is replacing an existing freestanding sign.

Adjournment


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Capital Center Commission Meeting – September 10, 2014

featured-capital-center Capital Center Commission Meeting
Wednesday, September 10, 2014 • 12:00 noon
Joseph A. Doorley, Jr. Municipal Building
444 Westminster Street, 1st Floor Conference Room Providence, RI 02903

capital-center-parking

Image from Bing Maps

  1. Roll Call
  2. Minutes
    Approval of Meeting Minutes of May 14, 2014 and June 11, 2014
  3. Ratification of Approvals
    Ratification of approvals from the June 11, 2014 CCC meeting
  4. Parcels 3E, 3W, 4E and 4W: Parking Lots
    Request for extension of interim parking lot approvals
    Presenter: Todd Turcotte, Capital Properties
  5. Report of the Chairman
    – Waterplace Park
    – Transit Infrastructure Bond Referendum
  6. Adjournment

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2014 Mayoral Candidate Survey – Jorge Elorza (D)

Jorge Elorza (D)

ElorzaPhotoWebsite: elorzaformayor.com
Phone: 401-400-2430
Email: info@elorzaformayor.com
Facebook: JorgeElorzaforMayor
Twitter: @ElorzaForMayor

Bio

Jorge Elorza is a Providence native, former Housing Court Judge, law professor, accountant, and community activist. He grew up on the West End, the son of Guatemalan immigrants, and graduated Classical High School before going on to URI and Harvard Law. The murder of a childhood friend brought him back to Providence from a promising career on Wall Street, and he has dedicated his life to serving the community ever since. He is running for Mayor to make sure that the opportunities that gave him a pathway out of poverty are passed on to the next generation of Providence kids.

Survey

1. Other Cities
It isn’t always necessary to reinvent the wheel when it comes to best practices. Across the globe small cities like Providence are doing amazing things to make their cities more livable, increase their tax base, and improve services. What city (or cities) do you look to for inspiration of what you would like Providence to be like or to strive for? What are the characteristics of those cities that you think Providence should emulate?

I look to many cities around the country as models for what Providence can and should do. One of the reasons why I want to be mayor in the first place is because I believe that the innovative leadership and substantive changes happening around the world right now are happening at the municipal level, and mayors are at the forefront of this.

Throughout this campaign, I have often referenced other cities as models for best practices and big ideas. In my plan for full service community schools, I looked to Cincinnati’s community schools model as an example for both engaging community partners, and management through its Local School Decision Making Committees. In that same plan, I also pointed to Chicago’s “Grow Your Own Teachers” Initiative as a model for encouraging diversity in our teaching force. Portland, Oregon was truly the model for my Export Providence Plan, which calls for doubling our export economy in the next five years; the Greater Portland Export Initiative was launched to achieve the same goal for that city, and there is much we can learn from it. I have often called for more police to live in the city, and Atlanta’s Secure Neighborhoods Initiative provides some great ideas for incentivizing officers to do so. My arts and culture platform calls for the creation of a weeklong festival in Providence that is directly inspired by Austin, Texas’ South By Southwest festival and the major impact it has made on that city’s economy. If I have the privilege of being elected, I have pledged to accept applications for my transition committees just as Pittsburgh, PA Mayor Bill Peduto has done. Even here in Rhode Island there are cities that inspire me: for instance, to address school funding, the City of Central Falls hired a part time grant writer for its school department at an annual salary of $30,000. In his first year, he brought in $600,000 in outside funding. I would like to add more grant writing staff across Providence’s many departments to help close funding gaps.


2. Snow Removal
The city has an ordinance that states that the abutting property owner must remove snow from sidewalks. This ordinance has gone under-enforced for years creating a major public safety issue for the city’s residents every time it snows. The city and the state are notable offenders in not clearing snow from sidewalks abutting their property (sidewalks abutting parks, public buildings, on overpasses, etc.). How will you hold private property owners, the state, and the City itself accountable for removing snow in a timely fashion, and how will you ensure that snow removal ordinances are enforced?

For private property owners, I will copy the successful example of other cities that maintain a “carrot and stick” approach to enforcing our snow removal ordinance. Exemplary businesses will be rewarded with certificates and neighborhood appreciation events. Businesses that frequently fail to comply with the law will be fined. And, as Mayor, I will ask the General Assembly to enact enabling legislation allowing the City to clear snow on pedestrian sidewalks and lien non- compliant property owners.

At the City level, I believe that many of the enforcement problems are due to the fact that the Department of Public Works has not had a permanent director for over two years. As Mayor, I would commit to hiring a permanent director in my first 90 days.

In general, we need to leverage better tracking and reporting technologies to identify problems, then empower the new Director of Public Works to track response times and manage workflow accordingly.


3. Street Parking Permits and Snow
The City recently ended its longtime ban on overnight parking introducing a permit system for City residents to park on the street overnight. Allowing residents to park on the street relieves the need to provide off-street parking in paved lots and yards. Reducing this paved area has numerous environmental and quality of life benefits. Unfortunately the City bans parking during heavy snow with no options for people parking on the street, forcing the need for off-street spaces during these storms. Other cities, including Boston, allow street parking during storms, banning parking only on designated emergency snow routes. Would you support allowing people with permits to park on designated streets during snow storms?

I am supportive of the idea. I would need to talk more with Public Works, and public safety agencies like the Police and Fire Departments, before committing to making this happen. I would want to know more about the potential problems that might arise and how this would impact efforts to clear snow. If this can be done in a manageable way, I will support it.


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2014 Mayoral Candidate Survey – Chris Young (D)

Chris Young (D)

youngPhone: 401-477-6178
Facebook: Chris Young

Survey

1. Other Cities
It isn’t always necessary to reinvent the wheel when it comes to best practices. Across the globe small cities like Providence are doing amazing things to make their cities more livable, increase their tax base, and improve services. What city (or cities) do you look to for inspiration of what you would like Providence to be like or to strive for? What are the characteristics of those cities that you think Providence should emulate?

I have the highest aspirations for Providence and this is one of the core reasons I can keep running for public office. I have run now 4 times for Mayor of Providence receiving 26% of the vote in 2006. Our campaign has incorporated ideas for economic development from cities all over the world. I as a candidate believe in taking the best of other cities successes and using them for the benefit of Providence residents. Life is both the physical and spiritual, for what would life mean without both of these? We must not forget God has a role in our success for with God all things are possible.

The first thing we can do for economic development In Providence is we can offer tax incentives like repealing the car tax and also offering businesses, the Universities, hospitals and non-profits the ability to participate in a zero tax program, much like New York state is offering. New York state is offering a zero tax for businesses willing to locate in certain areas when they do co-ventures with the Universities.

The city of Providence will develop and adopt a comprehensive, long-term (at least ten years) fiscal program and vision for the city’s future so that its current and prospective residents, businesses, and institutions will have the confidence to invest in and grow within the city. This program must take into account expenses, revenues, capital and infrastructure needs, the benefits of regionalization and privatization, and future growth. The plan will also establish a strategy for bringing real estate and other taxes in line with comparable regional cities. A residential and commercial property tax reduction will occur. Hospitals and Universities that offer job and business development opportunities for companies who are willing to locate to Providence and bring with them 500 new jobs would get tax abatement opportunities.


2. Snow Removal
The city has an ordinance that states that the abutting property owner must remove snow from sidewalks. This ordinance has gone under-enforced for years creating a major public safety issue for the city’s residents every time it snows. The city and the state are notable offenders in not clearing snow from sidewalks abutting their property (sidewalks abutting parks, public buildings, on overpasses, etc.). How will you hold private property owners, the state, and the City itself accountable for removing snow in a timely fashion, and how will you ensure that snow removal ordinances are enforced?

The state can be fined and cleanup costs can be issued for intentional neglect and the state’s sovereign immunity would not protect the state on intentional neglect.

The city will plow streets and sidewalks in the future much like what is done in New York state. A fee will be assessed on private or public property that has received 3 or more warnings in one season. The fee will act as a lien after three years of non payment but will be waived for good cause. We will have citywide sidewalk plowing after the city is solvent.

The City of Rochester provides supplemental service to help property owners clear their sidewalks during a substantial winter storm and we can adopt some of it’s practices. Rochester is one of the few cities in the United States to provide this service to its residents and it is outlined as follows from Rochester city government.

Sidewalk Snow Plowing Facts

  • The City begins plowing sidewalks once new snowfall exceeds 3″.
  • The City plows all sidewalks that are at least five feet in width.
  • Each sidewalk plow run takes about five hours to complete.
  • The City plows 878 miles of sidewalks. These miles are divided into distinct sidewalk plow runs of approximately 15 miles.
  • Depending on the severity of a storm, sidewalk snow plowing policies must sometimes be altered meet the needs of the situation.
  • The City uses private contractors to plow sidewalks.
  • Sidewalk plowing usually happens in the evening and early morning when pedestrian traffic is lowest, but this schedule is modified to respond to actual storm conditions.

Fees

  • Sidewalk snow plowing is financed by an embellishment fee on your property tax bill that is based on the front footage of a property.
  • Embellishment fees, charges for specific services, are included on the annual property tax bill. The fees are based on a property’s front footage. To figure out an embellishment charge, the embellishment rate is multiplied by the property’s front footage. For corner properties, the front footage comprises 1/3 of the longer side’s footage plus the full footage of the lot’s shorter side.

3. Street Parking Permits and Snow
The City recently ended its longtime ban on overnight parking introducing a permit system for City residents to park on the street overnight. Allowing residents to park on the street relieves the need to provide off-street parking in paved lots and yards. Reducing this paved area has numerous environmental and quality of life benefits. Unfortunately the City bans parking during heavy snow with no options for people parking on the street, forcing the need for off-street spaces during these storms. Other cities, including Boston, allow street parking during storms, banning parking only on designated emergency snow routes. Would you support allowing people with permits to park on designated streets during snow storms?

Yes, our campaign would adopt the Boston parking policy during snow storms and we support allowing people with permits to park on designated streets during snow storms. I lived in Boston during my college years at Boston University and found the parking program easy and effective.


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2014 Mayoral Candidate Survey – Daniel S. Harrop, M.D. (R)

Daniel S. Harrop, M.D. (R)

harropWebsite: Harrop.org
Phone: 401-390-2790
Email: HarropVictory@gmail.com
Facebook: Dr. Daniel Harrop
Twitter: @DanHarrop

Bio

Dr. Dan Harrop is a native of West Warwick, RI. He received his B.A., M.D. and post-doctoral training in Psychiatry at Brown University, and his M.B.A. from Heriott-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland. Retired from nearly 30 years as a faculty member at both the Harvard and Brown University Medical Schools, he is currently a consultant for several major insurance organizations, including ValueOptions, BHM Healthcare, and Focus Behavioral Health. Dr. Harrop is Chairman of the R.I. Center for Freedom and Prosperity, a 501c3 research policy institute, and President of the Roosevelt Society, a 501c4 social welfare advocacy organization.

Survey

1. Other Cities
It isn’t always necessary to reinvent the wheel when it comes to best practices. Across the globe small cities like Providence are doing amazing things to make their cities more livable, increase their tax base, and improve services. What city (or cities) do you look to for inspiration of what you would like Providence to be like or to strive for? What are the characteristics of those cities that you think Providence should emulate?

At this time, Providence should be looking to Detroit for inspiration. Just months after filing for bankruptcy, Detroit’s leaders unveiled detailed plans for the city’s recovery, which laid out a blueprint for future spending and ways the city could pay back its creditors. The plans look optimistically toward a Detroit with renewed city services — a draw for developers and new businesses. Business leaders, corporations and foundations are committing funds to help revitalization. Even locally, Central Falls can provide a model on how to “re-boot” the city after years of mismanagement and stabilize finances. We be laser-focused on the three crucial issues in the city: saving the collapsing pension fund, reducing the near national-record high property taxes.


2. Snow Removal
The city has an ordinance that states that the abutting property owner must remove snow from sidewalks. This ordinance has gone under-enforced for years creating a major public safety issue for the city’s residents every time it snows. The city and the state are notable offenders in not clearing snow from sidewalks abutting their property (sidewalks abutting parks, public buildings, on overpasses, etc.). How will you hold private property owners, the state, and the City itself accountable for removing snow in a timely fashion, and how will you ensure that snow removal ordinances are enforced?

Private Property owners should be appropriately ticketed (fined) after a brief public relations campaign as a warning this is coming – essentially the same as for those who do not recycle. The city’s failure to clear its own sidewalks is a failure of administration in the City Hall, and the appropriate officer charged with seeing this is done needs to be called to task. As to the State? Being sovereign there is little we can do but try to work with state officials to remind them of their responsibilities.


3. Street Parking Permits and Snow
The City recently ended its longtime ban on overnight parking introducing a permit system for City residents to park on the street overnight. Allowing residents to park on the street relieves the need to provide off-street parking in paved lots and yards. Reducing this paved area has numerous environmental and quality of life benefits. Unfortunately the City bans parking during heavy snow with no options for people parking on the street, forcing the need for off-street spaces during these storms. Other cities, including Boston, allow street parking during storms, banning parking only on designated emergency snow routes. Would you support allowing people with permits to park on designated streets during snow storms?

I would support alternative parking areas when a storm is coming, which may not be on the street – for safety reasons the streets need to be plowed, and some of our small and older streets can barely get cars down. There would be some streets designated as OK to park, but not all, during a storm.


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City Plan Commission Meeting – August 19, 2014

featured-bikeped City Plan Commission Meeting
Tuesday, August 19, 2014 – 4:45pm
444 Westminster Street, First Floor

Opening Session

  • Call to Order
  • Roll Call
  • Approval of minutes from June 29th meeting – for action
  • Director’s Report

City Council Referral

adrianhallway

Adrian Hall Way – Image from Google Street View

1. Referral 3381 – Petition to abandon Adrian Hall Way The applicant, Trinity Repertory Company, is requesting to abandon the entirety of Adrian Hall Way including AP 25 Lot 179 – for action (Downtown)

2. Referral 3382 – Petition to abandon a portion of Stanhope Street The applicant intends to abandon the portion of Stanhope Street adjacent to AP 97 Lot 12 to add to the area of the lot – for action (Charles)

Minor Subdivision

3. Case No. 14-027 MI – 345 Harris Ave The applicant is requesting to subdivide a lot at 345 Harris Ave measuring approximately 183,884 SF into two lots measuring 29,585 SF and 154,299 SF respectively – for action (AP 27 Lot 284, Valley)

Public Informational Meeting Major Land Development Project

4. Case No. 14-028MA – 345 Harris Ave (Master Plan Approval) The applicant is seeking master plan approval to develop the subdivided portion of the subject lot as a parking lot that will provide 86 parking spaces. Public comment will be taken – for action (AP 27 Lot 84, Olneyville)

Continue Reading →

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City Plan Commission Meeting – July 29, 2014

featured-bikeped City Plan Commission Meeting
Tuesday, July 29, 2014 – 4:45pm
444 Westminster Street, First Floor

Opening Session

  • Call to Order
  • Roll Call
  • Approval of minutes from June 17th meeting – for action
  • Approval of minutes from July 15th – for action
  • Director’s Report

City Council Referral

1. Referral No. 3379 – Petition to abandon a portion of Amherst Street The petitioner is requesting to abandon a portion of the width of Amherst Street between 125 Amherst Street (AP 62 Lot 274) and 120 Amherst Street (AP 62 Lot 284) – for action (Olneyville)

2. Referral 3380 – Amendment of the Charles Street Renewal Project Plan Review of the amendment for conformance with the Comprehensive Plan. The amendment proposes expansion of the boundaries of the project area and targets certain blighted properties for acquisition – for action (Charles)

Minor Subdivision

3. Case No. 14-023 MI – 52 Sussex Street The applicant is requesting to subdivide a lot at 52 Sussex Street measuring approximately 11,276 SF into two lots measuring 5,433 SF and 5,821 SF – for action (AP 76 Lot 358, Wanskuck)

Public Heariing – Major Land Development Project

mcdonalds-rendering

4. Case No. 13-039MA – 48-54 Plainfield Street and 4-14 Atwood Street (Preliminary Plan Approval) The applicant is seeking preliminary plan approval to construct a free standing fast food restaurant with a drive through and a free standing retail department store on a vacant commercial lot. The applicant received relief from the Zoning Board of Review for front yard setbacks and a special use permit for a drive through use. A total of 56 parking spaces are proposed for the development, which measures approximately 64,295 SF. Public comment will be taken – for action (AP 105 Lots 46, 47, 66, 98, 99, 100, Olneyville)

Re: Zoning Providence

5. Update on Re: Zoning Providence A review of the organization and content of the draft zoning ordinance – for discussion

Adjournment


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ProJo: Providence City Council OKs tax treaty revision for Capitol Cove development

capitol-cove

ProJo reports that the City Council has approved a tax-stabilization agreement for the Capitol Cove building in Capital Center. The building will continue to house Johnson & Wales dormitories but the developer hopes to build a 169-unit apartment building next door.

The City Council gave initial approval Wednesday night to change in a tax treaty with the new owners of the Capitol Cove complex on Canal Street to let the building continue as a rented college dormitory, a move the developers said was needed to get financing for a new 169-unit apartment project they want to build on a vacant lot next door.

Added to the 134-units the owners of the Regency are planning and the real estate market appears to be showing signs of recovery in Providence.

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City Plan Commission Meeting – June 17, 2014

featured-bikeped City Plan Commission Meeting
Tuesday, June 17, 2014 – 4:45pm
444 Westminster Street, First Floor

Opening Session

  • Call to Order
  • Roll Call
  • Approval of minutes from May 20th meeting – for action
  • Director’s Report

City Council Referral

1. Referral No. 3377 – Petition to abandon a portion of Broadway The petitioner is requesting to abandon a portion of the width of Broadway between Dave Gavitt Way and Greene Street adjacent to Plat 75 Lot 460 – for action

Institutional Master Plan

2. Amendment of Brown University’s Institutional Master Plan The applicant is seeking to amend the IMP to reflect the School of Engineering’s expansion, property acquisitions, rehabilitation of the South Street Power Station, changes to parking and improvements to Thayer Street – for action

Public Hearing

PROVIDENCE TOMORROW – The Comprehensive Plan 3. Referral No. 3377 – Changes to the Comprehensive Plan Changes proposed include technical changes based on comments received from statewide planning and changes to the future land use map. Public comment will be taken – for action

Re:Zoning Providence

4. Update on Re: Zoning Providence A review of the organization and content of the draft zoning ordinance – for discussion

Adjournment


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Capital Center Commission Meeting – June 11, 2014

featured-capital-center Capital Center Commission Meeting
Wednesday, June 11, 2014 • 12:00 noon
Joseph A. Doorley, Jr. Municipal Building
444 Westminster Street, 1st Floor Conference Room Providence, RI 02903

credit-union-parking

R.I. Credit Union parking lot in Capital Center. Image Google Street View

Agenda

  1. Roll Call
  2. Minutes
    Approval of Meeting Minutes of May 14, 2014
  3. Parcel 1: Union Station Parking Lot
    Request for Extension of Parking Attendant Booth and Pylon Sign Approvals
  4. Parcel 15: RI Credit Union
    Request for Extension of Parking Approval
  5. FY 2015 Budget
  6. Adjournment

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City Plan Commission Meeting – May 20, 2014

featured-bikeped City Plan Commission Meeting
Tuesday, May 20, 2014 – 4:45pm
444 Westminster Street, First Floor

Opening Session

  • Call to Order
  • Roll Call
  • Approval of minutes from the April 22nd meeting – for action
  • Approval of minutes from May 5 special meeting – for action
  • Director’s Report

Providence Tomorrow – The Comprehensive Plan

1. Referral No. 3377 – Changes to the Comprehensive Plan Changes proposed include technical changes based on comments received from statewide planning and changes to the future land use map – for action

City Council Referral

2. Referral No. 3376 – Petition to amend the Zoning Ordinance The petitioner is requesting that article 401 – pertaining to outdoor seating – be amended – for action

Major Land Development Project

lafitness-elevations

3. Case No. 14-009MA – 1300 North Main Street The applicant is proposing to demolish an existing building to create a parking lot providing 300 spaces. The lot will serve a health club on an adjacent lot located in the City of Pawtucket. The item was continued at the April 22 meeting to allow the applicant to revise the plan – for action (AP 75 Lot 301, Hope)

Re: Zoning Providence

4. Update on Re: Zoning Providence A review of the organization and content of the draft zoning ordinance – for discussion

Adjournment


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ProJo: Secretive policies of Route 195 Redevelopment District Commission seen as ‘excessive’

The Route 195 Redevelopment District Commission’s policy not to identify developers who propose buying public land is more secretive than policies of other state agencies.

Without that information, Rhode Islanders will not be able to evaluate decisions by the commission to sell 17 parcels of land freed up for development by the relocation of Route 195.

Other state agencies, including the State Properties Committee and the Department of Environmental Management, withhold bidding details while seeking buyers for state land, to maintain leverage in negotiations. But none reached by The Providence Journal has set policies to keep secret the names of losing bidders once a deal is struck to sell land.

I can see where the Commission is coming from, but this Commission has to remain cognizant of the scrutiny they are under and leaning to the side transparency is in everyone’s best interest I think.

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City Plan Commission Meeting – March 18, 2014

featured-bikeped City Plan Commission Meeting
Tuesday, March 18, 2014 – 4:45pm
444 Westminster Street, First Floor

Opening Session

  • Call to Order
  • Roll Call
  • Approval of minutes from the February 25th meeting – for action
  • Director’s Report

City Council Referral

1. Referral 3374 – Petition to abandon a portion of Eddy Street – The applicant is requesting to abandon a portion of Eddy Street – for action (Downtown)

Institutional Master Plan

2. Amendment of RISD’s Institutional Master Plan (IMP) – The applicant is seeking to amend their IMP to reflect the acquisition or lease of the building at 189 Canal Street for office, studios or classrooms. The amendment will also provide information on parking and progress of construction projects – for action

Major Land Development Project

3. Case No. 14-003MA – 35 Holden Street – The applicant is proposing to construct a one story parking deck in the D-2 zone measuring approximately 27,552 SF over an existing parking area. A total of 176 parking spaces will be provided – for action (AP 4 Lot 255, Smith Hill)

Re:Zoning Providence

4. Update on Re: Zoning Providence – Presentation detailing the organization of the zoning ordinance and the content of articles one through five
– for discussion

Adjournment


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Downtown Design Review Committee meeting – March 10, 2014

featured-drc Downtown Design Review Committee
Monday, March 10, 2014 – 4:45pm
Department of Planning and Development, 1st Floor Conference Room 444 Westminster Street, Providence, RI 02903

Opening Session

  • Call to Order
  • Roll Call
  • Approval of Meeting Minutes of December 9, 2013
  • Annual Election of Vice Chair

New Business

1. DRC Application No. 14.2: 76 Westminster Street (Turks Head Building) Proposal by 76 Westminster Street, LLC to replace the existing revolving door with a new entry door system and ATM (for Bank RI) on the Westminster Street elevation of the building.

Adjournment


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ProJo: Reviving Olneyville: Providence plan seeks overhaul of public housing

atlantic-furniture

A strategy is being developed to give the low-income [Manton Heights housing] development an overhaul and link it to the rest of Olneyville — one of Providence’s poorest neighborhoods, but a community improving with a helping hand from residents, the city, business owners and nonprofit groups.

Called Build Olneyville, the ambitious plan calls for replacing the development’s buildings with contemporary housing and reconfiguring the layout so there are through streets and mixed-income families living side by side. They also want to double Manton Heights, create jobs and add community amenities for the whole neighborhood, including a new early learning center.

The goal is to inject Olneyville with $100 million — up to $30 million from a federal grant and the rest in public-private partnerships.

See also:

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